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Literature from the Himalayan Tradition (Swami Rama's) -- An Annotated Bibliography

Note: This is a work in progress. If you would like to contribute with editing or new annotated bibliography entries, you are welcome to do so by leaving a message here . For a list of publications that have not been annotated on this page yet, click here.

Also see:

Himalayan Tradition Annotated Discography (Audios)

Himalayan Tradition Annotated Filmography (Videos)

A

Ajaya, Swami. Yoga Psychology: A Practical Guide to Meditation. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1976, 114 pp. ISBN: 0-89389-052-9.


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Anderson, Sandra and Rolf Sovik. Yoga: Mastering the Basics. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 2000., ~240 pp., ten chapters, index, about the authors, recommended books and practice tapes, illustrated. ISBN: 0-89389-155-X.

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B

Ballentine, Rudolph. Transition to Vegetarianism: An Evolutionary Step. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1987 (second printing 1991), ~309 pp, foreword by Dr. Patrick C. Pietroni, preface, six chapters, endnotes, index, about the author. ISBN: 0-89389-104-5.


Boyd, Doug. Swami: Encounters with Modern Mystics. ISBN: 0-89389-142-8.

First part of the book offers fascinating first-hand information on Swami Rama’s first years in the US and his experiments on control over the autonomic nervous system at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka, Kansas.

Branen, Damini. “Yoga Sadhana Journal: A Collection of Writings.” Unpublished, July 2000.

It includes a checklist/idea list for sadhana as “a scientist’s notepad” (the yogi as a self-observing scientist); “a personal friend”; “an inspirational tool”; “a record of yogic practices”; and “a meditation journal.” Then a few tips from two books on journaling are provided.  Finally, there are two excerpts attributed to Swami Rama on internal dialogue.

The main point of the sadhana journal would be to increase our capacity of awareness and introspection during sadhana as to create or being able to hear our internal dialogue and make the mind our best friend so we can actually improve in our sadhana (as opposed to do our sadhana in a mechanical way without awareness, which will not lead us anywhere or will not allow us to make faster or more expedite progress).

C

Coulter, H. David. Anatomy of Hatha Yoga: A Manual for Students, Teachers, and Practitioners. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 2004[2001], 623 pp, illustrations, subject index.


D

Dabral, Pandit Hari Shankar. “Foundation in the Tradition of the Himalayan Masters as Taught by Shri Swami Rama of the Himalayas.” Unpublished, no date, 6 pp.


This article was composed based on a talk by Pandit Dabral at a teachers’ intensive with Swami Veda in November 1999. Parampara (“the Tradition”) is the Guru.  Teaching comes from the “Source.” If we are adhikari, the Guru will transfer the teaching on us.

K

Khanna, Krishna Swaroop. Respected Guru Dev Swami Ram.


It reprints several of the stories in Living with the Himalayan Masters. It adds at the end a few more Swami Rama short stories known to the author, which are not included in Living with the Himalayan Masters. Needs English editing.

N

Nuernberger, Phil. Freedom from Stress: A Holistic Approach. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy, 1981 (printed in 2003 at G.S. Graphic Arts, New Delhi), foreword by Barbara B. Brown, illustrations. ISBN: 0-89389-071-5 (cloth); 0-89389-064-2 (paper)


I found this book to be at times a bit biased toward the behaviorist side. It provides interesting and useful advice and insights, and some excellent chapters, such as chapter 3 on mind and stress.

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O

O’Brien, Justin. Walking with a Himalayan Master, Swami Rama.


This is a very personal and nicely written chronicle of the life of a student with Swami Rama. Many of the amazing miraculous powers or siddhis of Swami Rama are related first hand by witness O’Brien.

R

Rama, Swami. The Art of Joyful Living. Honesdale, PA: Himalayan Institute Press, 2003[1989] (seventh printing, India), 177 pp., foreword by Pandit Rajmani Tigunait, ten chapters, glossary, about the author. ISBN: 0-89389-236-X.


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Rama, Swami. Choosing a Path. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1996[1982] (printed in 2003 in India). ISBN: 0-89389-077-4.

Swami Rama shares enlightened, inspiring thoughts in chapter 1.

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Rama, Swami. Conscious Living: A Guidebook for Spiritual Transformation. Swami Ram Nagar, Dehradun, India: Himalayan Institute Hospital Trust, 2005 [2002, A Personal Philosophy of Life], 146 pp., nine chapters, appendices, ISBN: 81-88157-03-1.

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Rama, Swami. Joints & Gland Exercises as Taught by Sri Swami Rama of the Himalayas. Illustrations by Rashmi.  Illinois, USA: Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science & Philosophy, 1974, 47 pp., 40 figures.

Rama, Swami. Living with the Himalayan Masters: Spiritual Experiences of Swami Rama, edited by Swami Ajaya. Honesdale: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1996[1978], 487 pp., illustrations, glossary of terms.  ISBN: 0-89389-156-8.

The book consists of autobiographical stories about Swami Rama’s adventures in the Himalayas as a child and adolescent, and stories about his young adulthood in India.  Highly stylized, it does not go in detail about some personal information on Swami Rama, like his marriage and children. It reminds me of Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda, where the chela or student goes from master to master absorbing every single bit of teaching like a sponge and there are a lot of miracles described.

In this book Swami Rama describes some general characteristics of diverse yogic practices and observations, which together with the narrative of spiritual search and self-conquest has served as spiritual inspiration to many sadhakas ever since it was published. This book has certainly become a classic in today’s spiritual literature. If you are not into miracles, it is possible to overlook that and focus on the spiritual messages that each chapter offers.

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Rama, Sri Swami. Māndūkya Upanishad: Enlightenment without God. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1982, 124 pp., preface, publisher’s note, two chapters, glossary. ISBN: 0-89389-084-7.

Rama, Swami. Meditation and Its Practice. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1998[1992] (fourth printing 2004; new edition: 2005, printed in India by Sri Sai Leela Trust, New Delhi), ~108 pp., introduction by Rolf Sovik, preface, six chapters, questions and answers on the practice of meditation, recommendations for further study, appendix A: relaxation exercises, appendix B: breath training, glossary, about the author, illustrations, diagrams. ISBN: 0-89389-153-3.

This is a nice, clearly written book on the basics of meditation. It is particularly useful to people who would like to tread the path of the Himalayan Tradition as transmitted by Swami Rama.

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Rama, Swami. Path of Fire and Light, Vol. 1: Advanced Practices of Yoga. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1986, 180 pp., foreword, introduction, five chapters, glossary, index, about the author. ISBN: 0-89389-097-9.

It describes several secret yogic techniques of breathing and kundalini yoga.

For a commented note, click here

Rama, Swami. Path of Fire and Light, Vol. 2: A Practical Companion to Vol. 1. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1996[1988], 200 pp., twelve chapters, glossary, index, about the author. ISBN: 0-89389-112-6.

Based on a seminar given in 1987, the first six chapters is general advice on how to enter the path of meditation. Then after chapter seven the book gets more substantial, chapters ten (“Kundalini and the Chakras”) and eleven (“Exercises”) being the most useful ones. Even though this is volume 2, it should actually be read before vol. 1, the latter describing the advanced practices. Vol. 2 contains useful information on how to do yoga nidra and agni sara, both important practices.

Rama, Swami. Perennial Psychology of the Bhagavad Gita.

Rama, Swami. A Practical Guide to Holistic Health, Revised Edition. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1999[1980], ~101 pp., foreword by Sukamal Saha, M.D. seven chapters, about the author. ISBN: 0-89389-174-6.

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Rama, Swami. The Royal Path: Practical Lessons on Yoga. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1998[1979, originally published as Lectures on Yoga], 138 pp., figures, glossary. ISBN: 0-89389-152-5.

This nice, clearly written book is on the basics of hatha yoga. It is especially useful to people who would like to tread the path of the Himalayan Tradition, as expounded by Swami Rama.

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Rama, Swami. Sadhana: The Essence of Spiritual Life; A Companion Guide for the Seeker. New Delhi: Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science & Philosophy, 1996, 139 pp.

Written in a poetic way, it consists of several chapters woven seamlessly as to make a long poem of the entire book. One of the main themes is that God is in oneself, all the potentiality for self-realization is in oneself. We need to look inwardly and practice with perseverance to attain self-realization.

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Rama, Swami, Rudolph Ballentine, and Alan Hymes. Science of Breath: A Practical Guide, by. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 1998[1979], 119 pp. ISBN-10: 0-89389-151-7.

This is an interesting scientific book for general readership on the mechanics of breath and some basic principles of pranayama by Swami Rama and some of his M.D. students.

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Rama, Swami, Rudolph Ballentine, and Swami Ajaya. Yoga and Psychotherapy: The Evolution of Consciousness. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy, 1976 (seventh printing 1993), ISBN: 0-89389-036-7.

It includes some excellent chapters, like chapter 3.

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S

Samskṛti and Judith Franks. Hatha Yoga Manual II. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1978, 165 pp., introduction, index, illustrations. ISBN: 0-89389-043-X.


Description of many important hatha yoga practices in the Himalayan Tradition. It is organized as: who should use this manual; shat kriyas; bandhas and mudras; meditative asanas; hero series; cultural asanas; relaxation; sixty-one points; pranayama.

Samskṛti and Veda. Hatha Yoga Manual I, Second Edition Revised and Expanded. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1985[1977], 187 pp., introduction by Pandit Rajmani Tigunait, appendices, index, illustrations. ISBN: 0-89389-082-0.

It describes core hatha yoga practices in the Himalayan Tradition. It is organized as: attitudes, hints, and cautions; yamas and niyamas; relaxation postures; stretching and limbering exercises; sun salutation; asanas and preparatory exercises; relaxation exercises; breathing exercises.

T

Tigunait, Pandit Rajmani. At the Eleventh Hour: The Biography of Swami Rama. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 2001.


Highly clarifying book on Swami Rama’s autobiography, Living with the Himalayan Masters. It includes much unknown biographical information on Swami Rama gathered by Dr. Tigunait, one of Swami Rama’s closest disciples and foremost students.

Tigunait, Pandit Rajmani. Tantra Unveiled: Seducing the Forces of Matter & Spirit. Honesdale, PA: Himalayan Institute Press, 1999 (second printing 2004), 152 pp., foreword by Deborah Willoughby, seven chapters, glossary. ISBN 0-89389-158-4.

Chapter One: “The Living Science of Tantra”
Chapter Two: “Where Tantra Still Thrives”
Chapter Three: “Finding the Way In”
Chapter Four: “The First Initiation: Mantra”
Chapter Five: “The Second Initiation: Yantra”
Chapter Six: “The Third Initiation: Chakra Puja”
Chapter Seven: “A Practice for Seducing the Forces of Matter and Spirit”

V

Veda Bharati, Swami. Beginning Meditation. Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, n.d., 12 pp.


It explains the steps of the meditation method and the sequential steps in learning to breathe diaphragmatically.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Contemplative Walking. (Unpublished PDF doc downloaded from the HYT-TTP website, n.d.)

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Daily Schedule of a Sadhaka, n.d., Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 5 pp.

It talks about the importance of regularity, frequency, length, depth, and surrender in the practice (using meditation as an example).

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Five Pillars of Sadhana. Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 2007, 19 pp.

The five pillars of sadhana are: stillness, silence, fasting, celibacy, and conquest of sleep. They are interdependent, they support each other. For example, if we consider stillness or silence as the central ones, the other four would be the pillars. Each of these pillars or steps are subdivided into many sub-steps. One should attempt them gradually in order not to hurt oneself. At least three of them are obviously related to the conquest of some of the four primitive fountains or urges which may disturb sadhana: sex (the pillar would be celibacy); food (the pillar would be fasting); and sleep (the pillar would be the conquest of sleep). To succeed in sadhana one should practice the five pillars. By practicing one pillar thoroughly the other four pillars will be practiced by default.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. “Global Full Moon Meditation.”

Document consists of:
(1) A brief handwritten introductory letter by Swami Veda.
(2) A longer, typed letter explaining in what consists the global full moon meditation, by Swami Veda. When people meditate together across the globe and at the same time they may connect with the universal Guru mind and generate a stronger mindfield, according to Swami Veda.
(3) A one-page flyer. To make times of meditation match among people who live in different meridians of the globe, they should sit at specific local times, so in one place might be evening, in another morning, etc. but it is happening at the same universal time.
(4) A three-page handout with instructions on how to meditate. This is especially helpful to beginners who have not received the Himalayan Tradition meditation instructions before and also as a reminder for those who have.

Veda Bharati, Swami. (Pandit Usharbudh Arya). God. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy, 1979 (printed in India), introduction by Swami Rama. ISBN: 0-89389-060-X.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. The Himalayan Tradition of Yoga Meditation. n.d., printed 2007, Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 17 pp.

Chief components of the Himalayan system:
(1)   purification of thoughts and emotions;
(2)   mindfulness (self-awareness, deep self-observation);
(3)   breath awareness (includes nadi-shodhana, pratyahara, kundalini breathing, and sa-garbha pranayama (kumbhaka);
(4)   japa;
(5)   shavasana (for subtle body yogas);
(6)   dharana;
(7)   dhyana;
(8)   a qualified preceptor; and
(9)   transmission (experientially, through shakti).

Veda Bharati, Swami. “An Introduction to Buddhism.”

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Veda Bharati, Swami. “An Introduction to the Six Systems of Indian Philosophy.”

Transcendental questions about the nature of the universe, God, soul, and matter are answered in Indian philosophy by six systems: Vedanta, Yoga, Sankhya, Vaisheshika, Mimamsa, and Nyaya.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Mantra & Meditation. Honesdale, PA: Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 247 pp., foreword, introduction by Sri Swami Rama, fifteen chapters, appendix: photographs showing the use of the mala. ISBN: 0-89389-074-X.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Mantra: What & Why. Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 2007.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Meditation: The Art and Science. India: Wisdom Tree. ISBN: 978-81-8328-115-7.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Night Birds: A Collection of Short Writings, by. Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 2002, 253 pp.

Veda Bharati, Swami. Philosophy of Hatha Yoga. 1985[1977], Second Edition, Revised and Expanded. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan Institute Press, 95 pp. ISBN-13: 978-0-89389-029-2.

This is an excellent and inspiring book on the theory of hatha yoga of the Himalayan Tradition, as understood by Swami Veda Bharati.

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Veda Bharati, Swami. Smrti-Yoga: Yoga of Memory.  Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 2010.

In this booklet Swami Veda explains the close relationship between memory and emotions, providing a broad approach to the possible causes of lack of memory and how to improve it. Swami Veda uses the spiritual approach to map the causes and point out the solutions for lack of memory based on the sacred scriptures of India, Ayurveda, human behavior, and psychology. He also prescribes mnemonic exercises together with proper nutrition and some herbs. In this booklet, Yoga Nidra is emphasized as a good ally to enhance memory.

Veda Bharati, Swami. The Song of Silence: Subtleties in Sadhana. Minneapolis, MN: The Meditation Center, n.d.

It is currently out of print. It is a compilation of some of Swami Veda’s short writings:
Chapter 1: booklet “Five Pillars of Sadhana.”
Chapter 2: “Silence”
Chapter 3: booklet “Contemplative Walking.”
Chapter 4: “Subtleties in Meditation Practice and Philosophy.”

Veda Bharati, Swami. “Sources of Energy.” Revised version; originally published in Himalayan News, April, 1978.

Veda Bharati, Swami (Pandit Usharbudh Arya). Superconscious Meditation.

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Veda Bharati. Swami. The Yoga- Sūtras of Patañjali with the Exposition of Vyāsa: A Translation and Commentary, Vol. I: Samādhi-Pāda. Honesdale, PA: The Himalayan International Institute of Yoga Science and Philosophy of the U.S.A., 1986, 493 pp. (as of July 2014 Swami Veda has completed a revised and enlarged, still unpublished version of 850 pp.)

Veda Bharati. Swami. The Yoga- Sūtras of Patañjali with the Exposition of Vyāsa: A Translation and Commentary, Vol. II: Sādhana-Pāda. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass.

Veda Bharati, Swami. Yogi in the Lab: Future Directions of Scientific Research in Meditation. Rishikesh: SRSG Publications, 2006, 103 pp. ISBN: 81-8037-023-2.

It describes some of Swami Veda’s meditation experiments in the lab done in different countries through the years.

 

 

To Be is the Blissful Reality of Mind. To Do is the Activity of Love. Everything we Do is Just a Game to Recognize the Activity of Love.

There  are no people, things, or circumstances which are good or bad, beautiful or ugly; it is only our emotionality toward them what is there. Wisdom is to remain free from judging, aware of one's emotions. Alchemy is to transmute emotions, maintaining a homeostasis of harmony and wellbeing. Meditation is to recognize the thought that generates the emotion, observing it with equanimity. Mahamudra is to wake up after dying, having a vision of what has always been, is, and will be.

 

Yoga is a Technology of Consciousness-Energy Developed to Experience Union. It Transcends Religion and Culture.