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Technique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret TempleTechnique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret Temple

 

Enlightenment Through Vision

 

This four-session workshop covers the best known optic-neuronal visionary techniques to date --phenomena widely acknowledged by contemporary  science and advanced visual meditation techniques which have been highly valued in diverse traditions and places through time because of their effectiveness for attaining enlightenment.

Manu discovered most of these techniques intuitively during his childhood and adolescence, without knowing they were spiritual techniques, and he learn the rest as advanced yoga practices during his Himalayan retreats. Most of the techniques are based on physiological processes that involve making the eyeball still. This "cheats" the brain, which believes it is experiencing deep sleep, allowing the person to enter samadhi or mystic absorption, manifesting a state similar to deep sleep, but without losing consciousness. This comes together with and it is mutually reinforced by the learning of a vision in different levels or layers of depth or planes, without the help of the eye lense but rather as the result of variations in the practitioner's perceptual consciousness states.

First session

Developing peripheral vision and the anchoring on the "Being." The night trekkers of the US southwest, and the lung gompas of Tibet. Deep vision. Discerning 3D images in stereograms. What is hidden to a distracted consciousness is revealed to the meditator. Visions of light in the mid eyebrow and the trataka technique.

Second session

Facilitating the entoptic phenomenon of the blue field in our vision. Awareness of our leucocytes. Alternative phenomena in darkness.

Third session

Learning to see bindus or thigles in the eyeball or becoming aware of our myodesopsia. The technique of togyal or thogal from the Dzogchen tradition of Tibetan Buddhism and Bön. The subtle vision of bindus in darkness. The visionary of Emmental, Switzerland.

Fourth session

Other phenomena: phosphenes; hypnagogic images; visions of the inner parts of our body at an organic level, cellular and intracellular; stellar images; altering of the space-time continuum in the visual field; vision of the exterior total light; aura visions; vision of the internal signs of elemental/wind dissolution both rough and subtle which constitute the ego according to Tantric traditions--and their differences.

Related reading

http://www.eye-floaters.info/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entoptic_phenomenon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_field_entoptic_phenomenon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floater

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphene

 

 Technique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret TempleTechnique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret Temple

 

 

 Technique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret TempleTechnique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret TempleTechnique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret TempleTechnique of Togyal (Thogal ). Detail of fresco in the Dalai Lama's Secret Temple

 

 

To Be is the Blissful Reality of Mind. To Do is the Activity of Love. Everything we Do is Just a Game to Recognize the Activity of Love.

There  are no people, things, or circumstances which are good or bad, beautiful or ugly; it is only our emotionality toward them what is there. Wisdom is to remain free from judging, aware of one's emotions. Alchemy is to transmute emotions, maintaining a homeostasis of harmony and wellbeing. Meditation is to recognize the thought that generates the emotion, observing it with equanimity. Mahamudra is to wake up after dying, having a vision of what has always been, is, and will be.

 

Yoga is a Technology of Consciousness-Energy Developed to Experience Union. It Transcends Religion and Culture.